Sunday Sermon

“Those who won our independence believed that the final end of the state was to make men free to develop their faculties, and that in its government the deliberative forces should prevail over the arbitrary. They valued liberty both as an end and as a means. They believed liberty to be the secret of happiness and courage to be the secret of liberty. They believed that freedom to think as you will and to speak as you think are means indispensable to the discovery and spread of political truth; that without free speech and assembly discussion would be futile; that with them, discussion affords ordinarily adequate protection against the dissemination of noxious doctrine; that the greatest menace to freedom is an inert people; that public discussion is a political duty; and that this should be a fundamental principle of the American government.” [Emphasis mine.]

 

 

 

 

 

–Louis D. Brandeis

 

Bonus: I didn’t know anything about Justice Brandeis aside from the fact that in college we played Brandeis College and they were largely Jewish until recently. I was fascinated by this Fresh Air interview with Jeffery Rosen, author of Louis D. Brandeis: American Prophet. I found it super fascinating; check it out!

Sunday Sermon

“Freedom of movement is the very essence of our free society — once the right to travel is curtailed, all other rights suffer.”

William O. Douglas

 

 

 

 

 

 

-William O. Douglas

On The Page: Travels With Charlie

Being one for travel books, I recently consumed Travels with Charley in Search of America by John Steinbeck. Published in 1962, the book recounts Steinbeck’s  cross-country journey with his poodle Charlie. While Travels with Charley in Search of America did not supplant Blue Highways as my favorite travel book, I was enamored by some of his thoughts on travel and how it becomes a part of your soul.

The very first paragraph of the book drew me in (and was read aloud to Forrest):

When I was very young and the urge to be someplace else was on me, I was assured by mature people that maturity would cure this itch. When years described me as mature, the remedy prescribed was middle age. In middle age I was assured that greater age would calm my fever and now that I am fifty-eight perhaps senility will do the job. Nothing has worked.

Continue reading “On The Page: Travels With Charlie”