Cochise County Highpoint: Chiricahua Peak

After hanging out in Tombstone, I was ready to do some hiking. It was time after a long fall full of working!

The hike to the summit of Chiricahua was exactly what I needed. I made a foray up Peak 9308 with some off trail travel but aside from that summiting Chiricahua and Flys was seriously just a beautiful ridge walk in the park. Considering my low level of fitness and activity, this was highly appropriate.

In the 12 mile hike, I didn’t quite hit 3,000′ of gain but I did check off another Arizona County Highpoint taking me to 80% on the list!

2017 In Review: By The Numbers

Ha. Ha. Ha.

2017 was about numbers in the bank to put a (heated, insulated) roof over my head. But, for posterity’s sake (as if the global posterity cared about my numbers), here is my 2017:

Hiking:

I’m still working at resolving my weird boundary issues with running and hiking for 2018 but anyway, that’s my own obsession with data integrity. Anyhow, I hiked 150 miles in just 29 outings (down from 44 outings in 2016 and fifty in 2017). I PROMISE MYSELF TO BE BETTER TWENTY-EIGHTEEN.

Photo: David Wherry

I only summited sixteen peaks in 2017, down from 43 in 2016 and 56 in 2015. Considering the amount of free time I (did not) have, I actually don’t fret about this too much because when I made time to hike, I climbed big things. 2017 featured my highest average peak height ever. And apparently I did some steep stuff because I surpassed my 2016 elevation gain despite being wayyyy down in peaks and miles. (Admittedly, 2015 and 2016 were padded by some low elevation plains high points to achieve list completion eventually.)

I did get six county highpoints: San Juan County, Utah’s Mt. Peale, Navajo County, Arizona’s Black Mesa, Nevada’s Storey County highpoint Mt. Davidson, Jackson County’s Clark Peak and Eagle County’s Mount of the Holy Cross in Colorado, and Arizona’s Cochise County highpoint Chiricahua Peak. I’m only three peaks from finishing Arizona (80%), and three quarters done with Colorado (76.56%). I’m hoping to make a really solid run at Colorado next year. I have a lot of big but awesome peaks left in my home state!

Photo: Katherine Zalan

Running:

No wonder I’m not feeling my best. I ran 200+ times in 2016 but only 46 times in 2017. I need to be better about moving my body more (I’m headed out in a bit so I’ll be 2/2 in 2018 in a couple of hours!) Despite that cratering of number of times, I did only fall to 184 miles from 345 in 2016.

Training in General:

Didn’t happen. I just gritted my way up peaks because I needed them for my soul. I’m looking forward to living a life that can be much more balanced in 2018 and one of the things I’m looking forward to emphasizing is my fitness goals!

 


Past In The Numbers posts:
2013
2014
2015
2016

Local Adventure: Hayden Trail, North Trailhead

I almost didn’t share these photos. This little adventure on the Hayden Trail didn’t seem all that “worth” posting. It wasn’t grand, it didn’t go for miles and miles (I think we did three miles round trip?) but it was a joyful hiking adventure after work with my buddy.

The views of the peaks over in the Sneffels range in the dramatic raincloud influenced light didn’t disappoint. (Actually, I don’t know if I’ve ever been “disappointed” with a San Juan hike.)

Sometimes You Change Your Plans…Hiking with #otherpeopleskids

I was sitting at a local establishment in Ridgway drinking coffee and planning to go for a hike later that day. The owner’s daughter sat down next to me and said, “What are you doing today?” I told her I was planning to go hiking and her response was “Is hiking fun?” Knowing full-well that she’d been hiking before, I called her bluff and asked if that was code for “Can I come?” She agreed it was and next thing I knew, we were a hiking pack of three for the day.

I had five miles or so planned for the day but that turned into just barely two and I was totally fine with it. Sprocket and Elsie are good buddies and we all had fun exploring a bit. Sometimes I wonder what kids ask their own parents because when they have a non-parental adult all to themselves they’ll have the craziest conversations. We talked about public lands and how they belong to all of us (but how you can’t build a cabin because that would make other people feel unwelcome). We talked about snow melt. We talked about soccer and how I was going to have a house and quit living in my shed. I hope Elsie enjoyed it as much as I did.

 

Ouray Hiking: Chief Ouray Trail

What do you do when you get to work a couple hours early?

I needed to go up to Ouray to take care of a few things and found myself with time to kill before work. I had two and a half hours before I needed to arrive so I headed up to the Chief Ouray Trail access in the Amphitheater.

The trail is only two miles long but it is steep and I was able to get in almost 2000′ of gain!

It wasn’t too too hot but I definitely worked up a sweat while taking in the awesome view.

I really loved the short shelf portion once the elevation gain was done! (I’m a weirdo who also likes shelf roads and standing on cliffs.)

Eventually, Upper Cascade Falls came into view.

Negotiating the slushy snow bridge right above a falls was interesting!

A little bit further I got to what I believe was the bunkhouse for the mine. Time was starting to feel a bit short so I turned around here and headed back to town.

Not too shabby for two hours on the trail.

WCWS Road Trip: Capulin Volcano National Monument

After dropping Stacia and Andrea off at the airport I headed west immediately; it was time to get back to the mountains! I’d hoped to be able to hike New Mexico’s Sierra Grande, Union County high point but as I entered New Mexico the summer afternoon thunderstorm clouds began to gather.

Understanding that hiking it just wasn’t a good idea, I continued on. The storms had brought in some afternoon cooling so I decided to check out Capulin Volcanic National Monument along the way.

Since the visitors center was closed for renovation, I quickly perused the temporary gift shop and headed up the mountain. While the ranger at the top said that I could hike the rim trail, she did point out the gathering clouds “about 11 miles away” and asked that if it got much closer that I come down.

The rim trail was only a mile long so I knew it wouldn’t take me long to hike. Because I hadn’t had a chance to check out the visitors center, I was really excited to see the interpretive signs along the way. Capulin Volcano is only 60,000 years old!

It was a really different set of views than I’ve had in the past. I could see Black Mesa, Oklahoma’s state highpoint, off in the distance:

My views of Sierra Grande were excellent but the clouds continuing to gather around its summit confirmed to me that I’d made a good choice in taking a pass.

Back at the car, I grabbed Sprocket and walked him around the parking lot while inhaling a sandwich. My pup is one patient dude.

Uncompahgre Plateau… Peak Undisclosed

It was the last week of school and I might have bought a bottle of wine. My roommate might have “stolen” a couple of glasses from me which lead to a second bottle being opened. This might have hatched a plan for evening hiking the next day.

We might have tackled a 10+ mile hike after work. These might be the photos from a site that might be on the Uncompaghre Plateau.

Aw, we’re always hiking alone so Sprocket and I never have great summit photos!

There’s no might about it, that’s my little town in the valley:

 

After School Canyons

I wandered into my roommate’s classroom after-school looking for some motivation to go running. She declared the 75-degree weather too hot to run. I disagreed with 75 being too warm to run but when she suggested heading out to Uravan for a hike followed by Blondie’s burgers and shakes, I wasn’t about to say no.

It actually turned out to be close to 85 down near Uravan which is a little hot for Sprockey-Poo so he and I spent most of our time in the very bottom of the canyon. It was lovely though!