Thanksgiving 2017: Montezuma Castle National Monument

This is a continuation of my adventures from Thanksgiving last year. I got distracted with moving into my house sooooo not much got blogged from the trip. 

After having visited Casa Grande National Monument, I gave into the prehistory ruins compulsion and visited Montezuma Castle National Monument in Camp Verde. By this time, I’d decided to just pay for my national parks pass and get on with it.

Montezuma Castle actually allows dogs on the trail! There is just a single paved path that goes along the base of the cliff with the structure but because it is just the one path and because of the extreme temperatures, they allow dogs! It was a touch hot for Sprocket to wait so I was super excited.

The visitors center was smaller than the one at Casa Grande and I was left with a lot of questions about just how the people further north on the Verde were related to the people who had been to their north (ancient Puebloans) and south (ancient Sonorans). This bookstore didn’t have anything I could impulse buy to bolster my knowledge of the Sinagua people so I’m currently accepting suggestions for books about ancient cultures in central Arizona.

It was a super short walk out to the Castle; the toughest part was dodging people on the trail! Apparently it’s part of the post Thanksgiving trek to the Grand Canyon.

We wandered down to Castle A. Apparently, Castle A was even larger than Montezuma Castle during its occupation. The vigas that supported beams to the rock are still visible. However, this castle’s upper floors collapsed and the structure suffered a fire after the end of its occupation.

The National Monument has a second unit at Montezuma Well but I decided to continue north because I had a breakfast date in Moab the next day and I had another few stops in mind.

Thanksgiving 2017: Casa Grande Ruins

So upon perusal of photos uploaded to this site but not attached to posts, I realized that I hadn’t finished blogging about Thanksgiving. (Something about moving into a house?) Thinking way back to my exploration of Bisbee and Tombstone and hike of Chihuahua Peak… 

After a quick stop in Tucson, I headed north towards Phoenix. Along the way I saw a sign for Casa Grande Ruins. I have no idea how many times I’ve gone past the exit near the I-10 and I-17 interchange but this time I was actually wasn’t only not on a schedule but I had some time to kill. I pulled into the visitor center parking lot with the late afternoon sunlight bathing the ruins outside.

My curiosity about these ruins was sort of piqued by having learned more about the history of Native Americans in the southwest (and in the US more generally) over the past year. I basically knew nothing about the ancient Sonoran people and their culture and it seemed like the right time to check it out.

I had a good time chatting with the Ranger inside the visitors center. He’d worked at Bent’s Fort and I’d learned a fair amount about Bent’s Old Fort when I read Blood And Thunder. It’s definitely on my “to visit” list. I spent a chunk of time in the visitors center.

I’ve spent enough time in the greater Phoenix area that maps of the Gila canals and other Hohokam sites really grabbed my attention.

Outside, I walked around the plaza surrounding the Great House and took a look at it from several angles. (The Great House is not open to the public.) Casa Grande was the first prehistoric and cultural reserve set aside in the US (it was established in 1892 by Benjamin Harrison). The Great House seems like an improbably large structure to have survived for over 600 years.

Never one to just be content with a “sort of” understanding, I meandered my way back to the visitors center to make a stop in the bookstore. I picked up some “light” reading to connect what little I knew about ancestral Puebloan people to the ancient Sonoran people.

In my last days in the shed, I read this pretty raptly considering its all academic papers from a conference about ancient cultures in the Southwest. I’m sure a lot of the information is a little bit dated as far as current archaeological info goes but I learned a lot and developed a rather burning desire to make it down to Aztec Ruins and Chaco Canyon in the very near future.

As I left, the nice ranger reminded me that if I bought an America the Beautiful pass in the next month that they’d apply my entry fee and I thanked him before heading west to find In-N-Out and a place to get some sleep.